Q&A: The Gothard Sisters, Musicians/Dancers

Recently I had the opportunity to get to know three extremely talented young women. They are dedicated, driven, and determined – a trio to watch out for. Meet The Gothard Sisters!

Q: Who are The Gothard Sisters?

A: The Gothard Sisters are multi-instrumentalist musicians and dancers who are all from the same family! We play violins, guitar, mandolin, bodhrans, sing and all sorts of percussion as it is needed. Our main show is a Celtic variety stage show that we perform at fairs and festivals around the country, and in between those shows we have also recorded 5 CDs and are working on the 6th.

The Gothard Sisters are Greta (24), Willow (21), and Solana (16).

Q: How did you all get inspired to become musicians and performers? Who plays what instruments, and in what order were the instruments learned?

A: It was so long ago when I decided to start playing the violin (I was 5), that I don’t remember exactly what was the reason I wanted to play in the first place. My mom always says that I (Greta) was very sensitive to music, and that once when I was watching a violin concert she looked over to see that I had tears in my eyes because it was so beautiful. So it could have been from a live performance that I was inspired to play violin.

The dancing was inspired by Riverdance, which we brought home and danced around to in the living room. We all loved it and would put on different colored ice skating dresses in order to pretend to be the “good girl” and the “bad girl” in Lord of the dance.

I (Greta) play violin, and have played since I was five. I started playing the guitar in 2008, so not nearly as long but it is coming. I have also started playing a latin percussion instrument called the Cajon, and singing vocals in the group.
Willow plays violin and also started when she was five, a few years after I did. She picked up the bodhran in 2006 and has been learning the mandolin in the last year or so. She also sings vocals in the shows as well.

Solana started playing violin when she was 3 and has been singing informally since she was very little. Now she sings all the lead vocals, and plays the bodhran (taught to her by Willow.) She has been learning how to play the djembe as well.

Q: Of the many instruments you play, and the dancing, what is the favorite thing each of you likes to do?

A: Greta’s favorite thing to do is to play the violin, and arrange and compose new music for the group, which errs on the introspective and epic end of the Gothard Sisters’ sound spectrum.

Willow’s favorite thing is variety. She especially loves the numbers in the show where she can play multiple instruments and dance and sing in the same number, because she likes to shake things up. Her original compositions are more active than Greta’s, fiery and fast.

Solana’s favorite thing to do is sing. She has loved words since she was little, when she would talk nonstop to anyone who would listen. Now she loves playing with words and singing them through song.

Q: Am I correct that you started out doing Irish dancing in competitions and then decided to create your own act? Where was the first place you performed outside dancing competitions?

A: We started out as classical musicians in the Seattle Youth Symphonies and Irish step dancers with the Comerford School of Irish dance. They were separate activities and we rarely did them together. For the Irish dancing, we would travel to competitions in the region, as well as to the Oireachtas (the regionals for the West Coast), the Nationals (most frequently held in Nashville, TN of all places) and the World Championships, (almost always held in England or Scotland.)

So one year we were trying to raise money to fund our trip to the Worlds in the UK when we decided to put together a show combining the two things we’d been studying; violin and Irish dance. Our first “real” show was probably at the Jefferson County Fair or the Edmonds Waterfront Festival. Almost on our first “real” show, a talent agent from Nashville happened to be in the audience and asked us to give her a call. The rest is history. lol!

Q: Where all have you performed in the US and around the world?

A: We have performed in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, Wisconsin, Indiana, Pennsylvania, New York, Iowa, Tennessee, Georgia and Florida. We haven’t performed our sister act internationally yet, but hopefully that will be coming soon! (I love traveling!)

Q: What are the advantages and disadvantages of being a sister act?

A: There are many advantages to being a sister act, especially in our current economy. First, we all live in the same house. We have all our instruments, equipment, dance floor and music in the same house. We can practice as often and for as long as we want without having to coordinate band members and equipment in storage sheds. We also get along really, really well and know exactly how to work with each other, so no time is wasted trying to figure out personalites. When we travel we can all stay in one hotel room and rent one car. Getting through airport security with all our instruments is tough, but it is organized between us to make it smooth.

We can work on our own time and save money and stress by being a sister act.
There are a few disadvantages to being a sister act, although it depends on the family. I can’t really think of very many because it has worked out so well for us. A disadvantage is that if a “work issue” (a.k.a. a problem within the group, or a dispute that happened while were practicing) doesn’t stop at the end of the rehearsal or show. We then go to dinner together and wake up and have breakfast together and the problem is still there. It makes you fix your disagreements in order to keep the peace!

Q: What is the long-term goal – what are your dreams?

A: We would love to be able to make a living with our music and performances, and to provide good music for kids and families to listen to. What I listened to when I was little has influenced my whole life. So I would like to help the next generation that way. We also would all like to have families when we are older, so if we could keep performing and juggle that it would be perfect!

Q: If you suddenly couldn’t perform, what other passions would you want to pursue?

A: Solana really enjoys creative writing and baking, Willow loves sewing (she made our performance costumes) and teaching dance, and I (Greta) really enjoy teaching violin lessons and creating things, visually, whether in drawing and painting or in video or other media.

Q: Do things ever go wrong at shows? How do you deal with that, and what life lessons have you learned from that?

A: Things always go wrong at shows. Our first couple years of shows were a long workshop in every single thing that could possibly go wrong. Luckily we were out on such a long tour at the time (about 6 weeks before we would get a break) that we HAD to fix the problems and just get on with it. We kept notebooks the whole time and wrote down the problems and the solutions so that we would never forget them. The nice thing about a problem that happens in a show is that it is so obvious and so embarassing that chances are you’ll be so determined to fix it, it’ll never happen again.

Many things have happened during our shows. Microphones breaking, bows breaking, violins going out of tune, brainfreezes (when you can’t remember the song), slippery floors that make you fall during dance numbers, feedback from the stage monitors, Motley Crue soundchecking at the same time and coming through the mains at our stage, microphone dropouts, shoes flying off, skirts getting caught… pretty much anything that could happen to us, has.

Now we don’t even really have to write in our notebooks anymore… we’ve managed to fix so many of the problems we used to have. But I wouldn’t trade them in because of how much we have learned from them. There is nothing like a real life experience to cement knowledge.

Q: Three adjectives to describe each of you?

A: Greta: Optimistic, Funny, Creative
Willow: Calm, Logical, Graceful
Solana: Happy, Caring, Sunny

Q: We talk a lot about happiness on this blog. What makes you happy? What do you think are the elements of a happy life?

A: I think happiness is about living the moment. You never find happiness when you are out looking for it. There is always something that you are doing that can be turned around if you rethink your thinking. I think happiness is yours to create.

We love teaching and talking to kids at our shows, and even doing our shows is a source of happiness because we know that we are giving an audience a good time. We are constantly happy and grateful that we get to do this together. We do things all the time together, whether it is connected to the shows or not. We bike, jog, walk, play, cook, read, watch movies, create and joke together all the time and it is always fun.

The elements of a happy life are balance, gratitude and hope.

Connect with The Gothard Sisters!

 


Shameless self promotion: Don’t forget to check out my (Pam Stucky’s) book, Letters from Wishing Rock (a novel with recipes) too!

in print:
CreateSpace
Poor Richard’s Book Shoppe in Gastonia, NC
Amazon.com

ebook:
Buy for iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, iTunes
Buy for Kindle
Buy for Kindle in the UK
Buy for Nook
Buy for Sony eReader
Buy at GoodReads

Don’t have an e-reader? Get a free Kindle reading app!

Q&A: Kim Piper, World Traveler

Today’s Q&A is with Kim Piper, a woman passionate about travel and politics, with a life deeply influenced by family, history, and her childhood. Everyone has a story and a passion – you do too, I know it! Would you like to do a Q&A too? Let me know! Let’s meet Kim!

Q: If your life were a movie, what movie would it be?

A: Federico Fellini’s Amarcord… or Bill Forsyth’s Local Hero

Q: You seem to be passionate about travel and politics. What drives each of these passions?

A: Politics – My Grandfather was born in hillbilly country in Appalachia, Carter County Kentucky. He never made it past sixth grade but was one of the smartest, most well read and literate, political men I ever knew. He was passionate about fairness and taking care of people in the community. He was a great artist and he loved Mark Twain and had this quote framed in his living room “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness.” Grampa was a Wobbly, and a good friend of Scoop Jackson’s – they argued politics when they were young men, and stayed in touch through letters later in life. Mostly Grampa wrote Scoop letters about why it was bad land management policy to dam so many alpine rivers, and letters arguing why the Vietnam war was wrong (Grampa was a Veteran of both WWI and WWII) He was a dyed-in-the-wool Democrat and to this day all his descendants vote the Dems ticket.

Travel – all I’ve ever wanted to do, really, since I was a little kid. My parents had stacks and stacks of National Geographic magazines and I would read them for hours and hours WISHING I could go to all the places they covered. My family really didn’t travel. We lived in Seattle and spent the summers in a cabin on the water on Bainbridge Island. Lovely for sure! But I had this NEED to see the world, and as soon as I could I dropped out of college and took off and traveled as much as possible. LOVE it to this day, I am still planning to do a round the world trek for a couple of years! I love being in completely new places and spending time with people there, learning about their lives and their part(s) of the world. I love history too and loving travel, people, and history all go together so well!

Q: What is one story of a powerful/moving experience you had while traveling?

A: I had just arrived in Istanbul, my first time there, and it was during Ramadan. My internal clock wasn’t yet synced with Istanbul time, and it was really noisy because people are UP at night during Ramadan, I was restless and wandering around the hotel and ran into the owner of the hotel, and he invited my up to the roof deck for the Ramadan meal with his family. They were so welcoming to me, it was really fun talking and eating with them, they treated me like family. They even offered me Raki (the Turkish version of Ouzo), because as they said they didn’t drink alcohol but since I wasn’t Muslim, they knew I could and they wanted me to try their delicious Raki! The whole time till my Rick Steves tour came I had Ramadan meal with them and then we’d go wander up around the Blue Mosque in the Sultanhamet for all the Ramadan festivities which are AMAZING. To be treated like I was one of the family was the best part of that trip by far.

Q: If you could be a master of any talent you don’t currently have, what would it be and why?

A: Gypsy/Jazz Guitar – I’ve always loved the guitar and have just never taken the time to learn to play. I played piano as a kid, and can still bang on the ivories a bit, played mandolin with some bluegrass musicians for a while, but just always have been attracted to gypsy music and always loved jazz – and guitar.

Q: Secret talent you have that not many people know about?

A: I read water! Really LOL! I was a whitewater rafting guide for years.

Q: If you could give advice to your teenage self, what advice would you give?

A: Don’t worry about cliques or what the “in thing” is, go for what makes you happy, pursue those dreams, bug your parents if you love music and travel and want to experience those things, find a way for yourself, check out what’s possible, don’t let common dogma hold you back!

Q: What matters? What makes you happy?

A: What matters: from my high school yearbook quote from Love Song, Elton John and Lesley Duncan “love is the key we must turn, truth is the flame we must burn, freedom the lesson we must learn”

What makes me happy – people, work, community, democracy, the arts, music, books, learning, fairness, music, travel.

 


Shameless self promotion: Don’t forget to check out my (Pam Stucky’s) book, Letters from Wishing Rock (a novel with recipes) too!

in print:
CreateSpace
Poor Richard’s Book Shoppe in Gastonia, NC
Amazon.com

ebook:
Buy for iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, iTunes
Buy for Kindle
Buy for Kindle in the UK
Buy for Nook
Buy for Sony eReader
Buy at GoodReads

Don’t have an e-reader? Get a free Kindle reading app!

Q&A: Author Jeffrey David Payne

Q: Tell us a bit about your books and writing.

A: I’ve written two novels so far. The one currently on submission is called Far From The War. It’s a young adult dystopian novel about a girl from Orcas Island [Washington] trying to get back home in the middle of a modern day civil war. She has a very rough time. My first novel, The Wavy Line, is about a scientist researching the 21 grams phenomenon inadvertently inventing the warp engine. It deals a lot with the political consequences of technology breakthroughs, how the people who consider themselves “in charge” scramble to contain and control it, things like that. I’m working on my third novel now, a sequel to Far From The War called The Mail Still Runs.

I’ve been writing novels for a few years now, but for most of my “career” I wrote stage plays and screenplays. Early on – when my life consisted of having witty conversations while drunk – that’s what I wrote about. But even then there was always the idea of critiquing the established political and social order. In those early plays the way of doing it essentially amounted to rationalizing hedonism. But as I got older I felt like that style of writing, that approach to the recurring theme, felt a little flimsy. It didn’t have much of a shelf life. It’s like the movie Singles. When I was young I loved Singles and the soundtrack along with it, but as I got older I realized it didn’t hold up from a “grown up” perspective. The conflicts seemed silly and trite. So, like graduating from MTV to VH1, I graduated from Singles to Say Anything – if we’re going to stick with tortured analogies and Cameron Crowe films.

So I started out writing funny plays where the conflict wasn’t all that compelling. When I started to think about bigger conflicts, I realized that the ideas would be tough to realize on stage or on screen, especially with the production opportunities then available to me. And I’d always wanted to write a book – so I gave it a shot. I think the first time you write a novel, what you’re really trying to do is prove to yourself that you’re capable of doing it, maintaining the endurance required to lay down the first 100,000 words. After that it gets easier, because you know you can do it, and the emphasis, at least for me, shifts to what you’re doing and not so much on proving to yourself that you can do it.

Q: Where do you get your inspiration for your stories?

A: I’m generally a happy guy, but I do have a fatalistic streak and I spend an unhealthy amount of time thinking about how the world might end. That makes it possible to dream up some pretty tense and conflict riddled situations, but I try to combine that with an intimate point of view. In Far From The War, I explore the end of America as we know it from the perspective of a seventeen year old girl. I don’t ask the reader to take a side in the war, or even follow it closely. If I choose the point of view of one of the belligerents, suddenly it’s an overtly political book and it would be nearly impossible to avoid writing a polemic or something that felt like propaganda. I wanted to write about how the politically active can impact the lives of ordinary people, not tell the reader that they should all be Republicans or Democrats.

Q: How do you create your characters? If a character is based on or inspired by someone you know, do you tell them?

A: I’d like to think my work is character driven, so I do try to anchor my characters in real people. Sometimes I’ll even use real names in a first draft as mental cues, then change them later. Sometimes I’ll write a character with an actor in mind. This is more of a bad habit than a deliberate choice. For example, in Far From The War, I can’t shake the idea that the protagonist’s father is Paul Giamatti.

Q: It sounds like some of your works have a real scientific edge. Is that all stuff you already know or do you do research? When you’re researching something for a story, what’s your process?

A: My first book was very scientific and I did a lot of physics research and actually did quite a few physics calculations to come up with numbers used in the book.

Lately most of the research is geographic since my work usually involves epic journeys of one kind or another. For example, I use Google Streetview a lot. But to really get a feel, you have to go there. I spent several long weekends on Orcas Island researching Far From The War. One afternoon I sat down with the owner of the now defunct Sunflower Cafe in Eastsound. I talked to him and his kids about what it’s like growing up on the island, what they’d do if connections with the mainland stopped working, etc.  I also did a lot of research on the First Civil War (as we now call it at my house), including the Shelby Foote books. I’ve watched the Ken Burns documentary on the civil war about five times now. Most of this research was really just for allusions to draw between the two wars. A better comparison for the new civil war depicted in my book is the Spanish Civil War, so I’ve done a lot of up reading on that.

This summer I’ll be taking another trip to research the sequel to Far From The War (called The Mail Still Runs) and this will involve exploring Point Roberts and most of Vancouver Island.  For the third and final book in the series I’ll be taking Canada’s VIA rail all the way from Prince Rupert to Halifax. And one more trip I can’t talk about without revealing the end of the trilogy.

And I’ve already started researching the book I’ll be working on after the Far From The War trilogy is done, tentatively called The End of Theories. This one’s an economic thriller (if there is such a thing) and I’ve been doing a lot of research on economics to get ready for that. I’m working through a stack of books right now that includes Keynes, Friedman, Rand (ugh) and Krugman along with dry books on derivatives trading and arbitrage, etc.

Q: How does writing a screen or stage play differ from writing a novel? Is one easier than the other? What do you prefer?

A: The idea of writing a novel was intimidating at first, but now that I’ve gotten over that first book hump, I don’t think I’ll ever go back to scripts unless they’re commissioned. What’s frustrating about writing stage plays and screenplays is that they are not, in themselves, completed works of art. They’re blueprints. A script is not the final result. It’s just the start, and without someone to take what you’ve done and run with it, it’s a bit of a Quixotic enterprise. I love writing novels because you get to know your characters much better than the drive by you get writing scripts. It’s immersion, so the process is a lot more rewarding. That, and when you write a book, whether it’s published or not, it is finished. You don’t have to convince producers to do anything in order for your work to be fully realized.

Q: What is some of the best writing advice you’ve received or read?

A: My friend Joel – in the same breath I think – told me to read Infinite Jest and Stephen King’s On Writing. I’d recommend everyone interested in writing read both books, but especially On Writing. That, and don’t chase trends. Always write the book of your heart. Don’t try to copy writers you admire or write vampire books just because vampires are hot. The legacy publishing industry is always two years behind. So, if you’re going that route, you’re not writing for today’s readers, you’re writing for the readers of two years from now.

You have to trust yourself. If some big whig gives advice that doesn’t resonate or doesn’t pass the smell test, trust your gut. You’re writing your book, not their book. The example that comes to mind is the bible/gotcha manual of the industry: Strunk and White’s Elements of Style. A lot of it makes sense, but some of it I just can’t swallow. For example, according to Strunk and White, you can never, ever, ever use the phrase “the fact that.”  That really bugged me when I read it, not because I use that phase all that often, but because I resent being told I can’t use it. Writing Charlotte’s Web doesn’t given someone the right to quarantine whole sections of the English language.

Q: Worst advice?

A: My answer here is perhaps a corollary to my last answer.

I’m not sure if I’ve gotten bad advice per se, but there have been times when writer/agent/editor blogs have caused me to focus on the wrong things. They can give you the impression that all that really matters is Oxford commas, adverbs, conjunctions, and passive voice. You get so swept up in the gotcha’s agents and editors use to reject manuscripts that you can get a little lost. At least I did.  You can’t let imaginary editors and agents get in your head. It makes sense to research the industry, but when you do, just know that you’ll read blogs that claim using the word “but” in the first paragraph is an instant rejection. You have to hold on to that part of yourself that realizes this level of fault finding is arbitrary and ridiculous.

With my first book, I got some feedback from agents about the opening and had recently read a lot of blog posts about the all the gotchas. In this state of mind, I redrafted the opening and I hated it, even though it got a better response from agents. Everyone who’d read the book (other than industry people) thought there was nothing wrong with the original version. When I’m being honest instead of insecure, trying to imagine the perspective of some jaded Vassar MFA, I agree that the original version was better. It was the opening of “my heart,” if you like. The other version was changed to be a marketing tool, proof that I knew what the rules were, rather than the real book I wanted to write.

So if the best advice I ever got was “to trust your gut,” the worst advice would be “to trust the self-annointed experts when their advice conflicts with your gut.”

Q: Why Diet Coke when clearly Pepsi is better?

A: Ah, this is an ongoing struggle. Diet Coke is an addiction. I’m really too ashamed of it to defend it.

Q: Here on my blog we talk about happiness a lot. What makes you happy, brings you joy?

A: It’s a cliche answer, but the honest answer is my family. My wife and I had our first child about five months ago. Making a baby laugh is just about as good as it gets. I’m just waiting for him to get old enough to share my other great source of happiness, which would be travel. I love remote desolate places. Much of my first book takes place on an island in French Polynesia called Hao and one of my favorite spots on Earth is Tofino in the winter. It’s like being on the moon.

Q: Where, when, how can we buy your books?

A: I promised my wife that I’d publish Far From The War no matter what. So, one way or another, it is coming out. That being said, I’m still waiting to hear back from agents. I have a lot of partials out and a few fulls. One agent in particular seems pretty close to making an offer. If the trail goes cold, I’m likely to announce this summer that I’m self publishing the Far From The War trilogy much as you’ve for Letters From Wishing Rock, through CreateSpace, Amazon, etc. I’ve been reading JA Konrath’s blog a lot lately and his arguments echo discussions between my wife and I after the trail went cold on The Wavy Line.

We had a discussion about the economics of publishing several years ago and I suggested that traditional/legacy publishing is the new vanity publishing. Big publishers give you prestige, but little real support and only 1/5th of the per-book royalties, so the only compelling reason to go with a traditional publisher is the prestige factor, which is vanity. At the time I wondered if that was just a sour grapes rationalization on my part until I read JA Konrath make the exact same argument years later.

If you sit down and do the royalty math and consider how big publishers deal with publicity for debut novelists, you realize that you end up with all the responsibility for the success or failure of your book either way, and perhaps it makes more sense to self-publish even if the traditional publishers want to work with you.

In my case, I’d like to see how the traditional approach turns out, but given the recent shifts in book publishing and the new legitimacy of self publishing, I’m likely to self publish anyway unless a house offers me a lifestyle changing advance, which is highly unlikely.

So answer your question, I should have some concrete news along these lines in July: either the name of an agent or a release date.

Connect with Jeff!

 


Shameless self promotion: Don’t forget to check out my (Pam Stucky’s) book, Letters from Wishing Rock (a novel with recipes) too!

Download a FREE excerpt here.

in print:
CreateSpace
Poor Richard’s Book Shoppe in Gastonia, NC
Amazon.com

ebook:
Buy for iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, iTunes
Buy for Kindle
Buy for Kindle in the UK
Buy for Nook
Buy for Sony eReader
Buy at GoodReads

Don’t have an e-reader? Get a free Kindle reading app!

Q&A: Sephira

Sephira are musicians Ruth O’Leary and Joyce O’Leary, two brilliant, wonderful and talented women who spent a few years on tour with the group Celtic Thunder, and who are now out on their own making giant waves in the musical world. I adore them both and am delighted to share a Q&A with them! Watch their Facebook page (link below) for news on upcoming appearances around the country!

Q: How/why/when did you become interested in music and the violin?

A: Ruth: My playschool teacher started teaching violin and I was her first student!

Q: How long have you been playing, and what formal or informal training have you had?

A: Ruth: I’ve been playing violin since I was 6 years old and piano since I was 10. I had started taking violin quite seriously when I was about 15, so it was a natural progression for me to continue music into college level. Although, my career path has veered off the classical route, I do have a first class honors degree in Music Performance, which I’ve never once been asked for!!

A: Joyce: I started playing violin when I was 2 and a half years old. I started singing when I was fifteen and followed in Ruth’s footsteps and studied music performance at third level in the Royal Irish Academy of Music. In 2005, we started Sephira and haven’t looked back!

Q: Favorite memories in your career?

A: Without a doubt, getting a call asking us to perform at a private event for Larry Hagman and his wife was definitely one of our favorite moments so far. It was amazing to find out that an icon like Larry Hagman was a fan of our music!

Q: How would you describe your music?

A: Celtic Classical Crossover

Q: As you’re Irish, do people expect you to play Celtic music?

A: Yes, all the time! But the interesting thing is, that no matter what we play, people still feel that it has a Celtic sound. We’ve done a lot of work with Tourism Ireland and they have been using us as ambassadors for Ireland at many different functions across the US.

Q: In March you filmed a PBS special with Michael Londra called Beyond Celtic. Does this address the idea that not all Irish performers are in the Celtic genre?

A: I think it addresses the more new age Celtic sound which opens up a lot more avenues for artists like ourselves. At the end of the day, I think what’s really important is that music is played from the heart. If you can get this right, then I think you’re on the right track.

Q: Tell us more about the Beyond Celtic show? What’s it about, who is in it, when can we see it?

A: Beyond Celtic is Michael Londra’s new PBS special which we’re appearing as special guests on. Also featured on the show is Frankie Gavin and Dé Dannan. The filming took place on 18th March in The California Theater, San Bernardino in LA. It is said that Beyond Celtic will be airing on PBS nationwide from July/August. We are so excited about this project and it has been amazing to get to work with Michael Londra who is one of the nicest people you will ever meet.

Q: Where do you find the inspiration for your music?

A: Everywhere. Anything in life that sparks emotion is where we find our inspiration.

Q: What is your process in creating a new piece?

A: Melody always comes first for us, then lyrics and then chords. We started doing some co-writing with a well-known song writer at home, Shay Healy. It was great to see how other people create music and it made us experiment with other ways of writing.

Q: You offer confidence building music workshops for youth. What made you want to offer these classes?

A: The reason behind the classes is that we feel that children spend so much of their time practicing for exams or concerts and then when it comes to the performance time, often nerves take over and they can’t show their true colors. The idea behind our workshops is to boost children’s confidence and make it fun to show off what they’ve learned. Of course, there will always be nerves, but in a controlled way that will just add fire to their performance.

Q: What do kids learn in the workshops?

A: As well as building confidence and teaching performance skills, we also teach the rudiments of music.

Q: It seems youth could apply these skills to other areas of life, too?

A: This is very true. Just having the confidence to get up in front of a group of people and talk about yourself is nerve-wracking for most people. We encourage the children to get up and introduce themselves before each performance so they can connect with the audience more comfortably. This sort of experience is invaluable for life experience and will hopefully stay with each child forever.

Q: What advice would you give to kids hoping to become musicians?

A: Practice, practice, practice … and don’t give up!

Q: You have traveled around the country several times in a bus. What is it like to live on a bus?

A: It’s great fun, especially having a sister on the road to share it all with! The buses are very luxurious and they become like home. There are rules for life on the road and as long as everyone sticks to the rules, it makes bus life very comfortable! Now of course, we all love our hotel rooms when we get them!

Q: You recently moved from Ireland to New York to forward your career. What are some of the challenges of being a musician in Ireland?

A: We have a very specialized niche that works here in the US. There are more opportunities created in one day in New York than one year in Ireland. Ireland, although it’s a beautiful country, it’s a very small country with a very small audience!

Q: What do you think of New York so far?

A: We LOOOVE New York!!

Q: Can we hope for a new CD anytime soon?

A: Yes, the end of 2011/beginning 2012.

Q: What are your goals, plans, hopes and dreams for Sephira over the next few years?

A: Other than world domination!!! We want to expand Sephira in as many ways as possible. We want to put a complete Sephira show on the road with dramatic production and a full band behind us. We hope to have our music used in a big feature film in the near future. We want people to know the full scope of Sephira’s capabilities.

Q: What makes you happy?

A: Ruth: Being true to myself makes me happy. Knowing that my actions match exactly what I feel deep down creates harmony in my life. When I’m in that place, I radiate happiness which is infectious for other people (I hope)! But it’s definitely something that I keep working on because life always throws new challenges at us!

Joyce: The simple things in life make me happy! For example,  a smile from a stranger makes my day, someone making me a cup of tea, an unexpected hug from a loved one. Apart from all this though, happiness, I know, must come from within. Keeping myself in check, keeping myself grounded and constantly working on myself to make me a better person also makes me very happy.

Elements of happiness: positivity, encouragement, honesty, generosity, thoughtfulness and above all LOVE!

Connect with Sephira!

 


Shameless self promotion: Don’t forget to check out my book, Letters from Wishing Rock (a novel with recipes) too!

Download a FREE excerpt here.

in print:
CreateSpace
Poor Richard’s Book Shoppe in Gastonia, NC
Amazon.com

ebook:
Buy for iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, iTunes
Buy for Kindle
Buy for Kindle in the UK
Buy for Nook
Buy for Sony eReader
Buy at GoodReads

Don’t have an e-reader? Get a free Kindle reading app!

Q&A: Author Sinead Tyrone

Meet another author! Sinead is a poet and novelist – hopefully soon we’ll be able to see her book in print!

Q: Tell us a bit about your writing. What have you done in the past and what are you working on? Genre, summary?

A: I’ve tried a number of styles and projects and have discovered I like two styles best: fiction/novel, and free verse poetry. I am currently building a collection of poems I would love to have published, and currently working on the third draft of a novel, set in Ireland, about a young man who has to learn how to rebuild his life after losing his family.

Q: Where do you get your inspiration for your stories?

A: My inspiration comes from God, and from what I see in the world around me. Nature inspires me greatly, and watching what people around me go through. Sometimes tv or movies inspire me. Mostly I write what God puts on my heart.

Q: I know your current novel has to do with Ireland. Have you visited before? What are the challenges of writing a novel set in a place you’ve never been to?

A: I have not been to Ireland yet, hoped to get there this spring but that didn’t work out. I have been passionate about Ireland for over 20 years, so it was a natural choice to set my novel in. The challenges of writing where I’ve never set foot are that I can’t fully describe the way the light hits, the smell of the air at daybreak or evening, the sounds unique to a particular location, or the way a culture different than mine handles certain situations. Active imagination and deep research will fill in as much as I can until I can get to Ireland myself.

Q: How do you write – do you need to go into a quiet den, do you have to have music playing? Do you work on one section until it’s perfect and then move on, or write the whole thing then edit?

A: I cannot write on the computer! I write everything with pen and paper, then transfer it to the computer. My poems I write in one sitting, if I set a poem aside it’s hard to go back to, the moment is gone. My novel, the first draft was very random, the characters giving me different pieces at different times. The second draft pulled the pieces into a more cohesive form, what I didn’t have answers for I guessed at with big notes to research more. In the third draft I am writing in chronological order and doing the research as things come up so I don’t leave blanks or questions.

Q: Research: Love it or hate it?

A: I am a research fanatic! Love it! I can’t wait to delve deeper this time around!

Q: What is some of the best writing advice you’ve received or read?

A: Best writing advice: First, always have a pen and notebook handy (or a digital voice recorder if you’re driving!). You never know when inspiration will hit! The more important piece of advice was write what you’re passionate about. If it doesn’t stir my heart deeply I can’t write it effectively and it will never move my readers.

Q: Worst advice?

A: Worst advice: outline your novel’s chapters in advance. There’s no way, even in the third draft my characters have minds of their own and want to take me down unplanned roads!

Q: Here on my blog we talk about happiness a lot. What makes you happy, brings you joy?

A: God, the center of my life. My friends, the circle of love and support that helps me stand and keeps me laughing. Nature, bird watching, gardening, walks in fields or woods. Reading and movies of various styles. Hand embroidery. And chocolate! (M+Ms are life’s best addiction!)

Q: Where, when, how can we buy your writing?

A: Two of my poems appear in locally published anthologies dedicated to the victims and families of Flight 3407 which crashed near Buffalo two years ago. If anyone wants information they can send me a message on Facebook, MySpace or Twitter. As soon as anything else is published I’ll post it on these sites. And if anyone visits the Buffalo area in the future let me know, if it’s a poetry reading night I’d love to have you all stop in!

 


Shameless self promotion: Don’t forget to check out my book, Letters from Wishing Rock (a novel with recipes) too!

in print:
CreateSpace
Poor Richard’s Book Shoppe in Gastonia, NC
Amazon.com

ebook:
Buy for iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, iTunes
Buy for Kindle
Buy for Kindle in the UK
Buy for Nook
Buy for Sony eReader
Buy at GoodReads

Don’t have an e-reader? Get a free Kindle reading app!

Q&A: Sarah Moore, Life Sciences Manager at Pacific Science Center

Sarah Moore, Life Sciences Manager at Pacific Science Center, is one of my favorite people. (Don’t worry, you’re one of my favorite people too!) Her passion for her job is a joy to behold, as is her ability to see – and convey to others – the beauty and wonder in all things in our natural world. I’m so excited to get to do a Q&A with her!

Q: You are (correct me if this is wrong) the Life Sciences Manager at Pacific Science Center. How long have you had that job? Did you have other job titles at PSC before this one? What does a Life Sciences Manager do?

A: I am the Life Sciences Manager at Pacific Science Center. The job has evolved, but I have held it in some capacity since 1997. I worked here briefly before that, as an animal caretaker, an evening rental coordinator and a Science Interpreter.

My days are never the same which is why I’ve stayed so long. I might help the horticulturists pick up trash from our planters, or discuss with them how to grow more nectar providing plants. I get to file permit requests for 250 species of butterfly, which involves knowing a whole lot about butterflies. I helped staff make an exhibit on decomposer beetles by sticking spam in a skull for them to eat. I talk to kids about stuff they watch sea anemones doing, and how to treat animals on the beach. I talk to staff about doing their job with more mindfulness, I write letters of recommendation for fabulous high school interns, or show a VIP a chrysalis alive and wiggly and golden.

I have gotten to work with honey bees, go to beaches, grow hydroponic vegetables, and handle a newborn corn snake.

Summary – I like my job.

Q: Anyone who sees you in your element can see your passion for what you do. What exactly is it about what you do that you love? Is it sharing knowledge and education, is it working with kids, is it working with animals and nature …? When and how did you know that this was your passion?

A: What do I specifically like about my job? Some part of it is selfish. I can’t have unlimited weird animals at home and I don’t have unlimited guests coming over that I can yack with about my weird animals. Work lets me do that, and then lets me go home at night and have my own space (and my own family, guests and animals). But I have also seen benefits that are only apparent because I’ve been here so long. I have seen a change in attitude on the part of visitors toward many of our animals. Less fear, more curiosity. I have to believe that our exhibits have helped many people develop an interest in and love of sea life, insects, and strange animals of all kinds, and with that love, perhaps a deeper respect and desire for understanding.

I do also find kids and the growth of the human mind fascinating. I love the connections kids make and those they fail to make because they haven’t gotten there yet. I love their fearlessness when it comes to speculation and imagination. I also like that grownups come here and get to put aside some of their self imposed standards, and just play. The naked mole rats for some reason bring this out in people. One of my favorite things is when someone looks at them and just starts laughing. It’s not laughing at or even with them. It sounds like laughing for pure surprise and joy. I’ve seen kids do this, but perhaps my favorite was when an adult with an important job who was preparing a conference on urban pest species saw them and just cracked up, probably for ten minutes. It had probably been a long time since he had thought of animals in a non-strategic way, and just enjoyed them. I love that we let people do that, and that they feel safe enough to let themselves do it.

Q: Favorite creature(s) anywhere and why? (Insect, mammal, anything!) Are there any creatures (animals, insects, whatever) you don’t like?

A: Favorite animals = ants, solitary wasps (species where each individual builds her own nest without shared labor), crows, spiders, cats, coyote, goats, slugs. I tend to like animals I can actually see, or see signs of. I feel like I know them better. I like to watch animals build their homes, care for their young and go about their day, more than fighting, hunting etc. Most of those on my list have complex and interesting lives, except maybe spiders’ and slugs’ lives might be boring to me.

Don’t like = I don’t like touching fish and amphibians though I think they’re cool. Scared witless of centipedes. Healthy fear of bears, cougars, etc. I like other people’s dogs but I don’t think I could handle that much devotion.

Squirrels annoy me but geez they’re cute.

Q: You have goats and chickens … what else? What foods do you grow/nurture? Do you have a lot of farmland or are you considered an urban gardener? It seems like there’s a greater interest in farmers markets, locally grown food, buying or bartering for food from neighbors, etc. In your opinion is this a growing trend, stable, decreasing?

A: I have goats, chickens, also bees which are really my husband’s and son’s deal. I have a corn snake and three goldfish. I also have holes drilled in things for solitary bees and wasps to live.

We live on an acre. Half of it is cultivated urban farm; greenhouses, livestock, garden beds, apple, plum, pear and cherry trees, vine and soft fruit, etc. Half of the rest is just “front yard” but is next on the plan to turn into a garden. And the last bit is somewhat wild and will probably stay that way. There are a couple of madrona, some salal, and some volunteer hedgerow things. Birds and bugs like it there.

From what I’ve seen, there have always been people who want to farm, trade, be a bit more sustainable or even just a bit less involved in the drive for wealth. I’ve had the same desire for 20 years, and I don’t think I’m the only one.

What’s changing is that people with a little urban farm experience are linking up and finding each other via various social network options that didn’t used to exist. Just as scattered bits of habitat may not support a rare species, but corridors between fragmented wild places can give access to wider range, the links between urban farmers lets them be more engaged, productive, and competent. Some lost skills like home butchering, or propagating sour dough, need to be passed on, and it’s getting easier to find someone who can help with these things. So the skill set can grow, and more people won’t give up in frustration. And ultimately, become comfortable enough to find the political voice behind what they are doing.

Q: What can you tell us about the health of the Puget Sound and the marine life in and around it? Has it changed over time?

Puget Sound faces a lot of problems, from low oxygen in the Hood Canal area to acidification, to chemical pollutants to habitat destruction from construction and overuse, to litter which is ingested by the bigger macro fauna. Everyone knows this, but to see what it means, I wish everyone would go visit a beach. And visit the same beach again and again. Don’t move the animals or the rocks around, don’t pick things up.

Get really into the tiny life forms doing their thing. Let yourself fall in love with one beach. Take a lot of pictures and compare them. Different times of year or tides will look different, but you will also have a background to use when you look for change. A few lucky beaches have had a lot of work to help them get closer to their natural condition. Others may look the same, or worse. I believe if you love the beach and see it get hurt, you will want to protect it much more than if you read about it.

Think about what you do that hurts it, and change that. Think about how you can influence others, and do that too! One thing I have learned from Pacific Science Center’s little touch tank is that what we do to it really, really impacts how well the animals survive. If we rinse our hands of soap and chemical residue, we can literally add years of life to those animals. So if there is something you can do or someone you can talk to, don’t worry that it’s “just a start,” do it! It is a piece of a much bigger picture, but it might be a critical one.

Q: What are some ways parents can get kids interested in life sciences from an early age?

A: I don’t really know how parents can get their kids interested in science from an early age, but I have two suggestions. 1) show them what you are passionate about and then tactfully give them breaks from it. 2) follow up on their interests and try to learn about them. Even if it’s not your thing, learn about volcanoes and dinosaurs when they’re three, or gorillas or race cars or whatever they care about that also gets them learning.

Kids need to see that grownups still have curiosity and things to learn. Let them teach you at least a third of the time. Let them see you ask questions and stumble and goof around. Allow a little messiness for doing experiments or storing specimens or whatever. And don’t reject science fiction or even magic as pathways to science. Interest comes first, then curiosity, and finally more critical skills, which aren’t much use until the other ones have developed.

Q: What makes you happy?

A: Since I have a big garden, working in it makes me happy. I like to work till I can barely move. I actually love gardening in the rain, or doing winter pruning of trees when no one else is outside. I like the decision making process that goes with it. I like watching things like animals and bugs doing their activities, or plants growing over time, or the different beach life at different tide levels. I’m quite introverted and I have a job with a lot of people around, so some of my happiest moments are stolen chances to be alone. On the other hand, I have started making new friends recently and I really love when I meet someone and talk and know that I like them. A lot of my grownup life I haven’t been able to do that easily so it’s been a great gift that it’s becoming more possible. Perhaps as I mature I’ve stopped eying other women as competitors? I don’t know. Oh, also I love shoes.

Q: Talk about work/life balance. Do you think you’ve achieved it? What are the components of a good balance?

A: Work/life balance. This was very hard when I had a preschooler. At times, I don’t think I did either very well. Everything was about schedule and there was no room for fun or deviation from the routine. But it’s still hard because I expand my activities to fill any available time. On the other hand, work is part of life, so really it’s just balance I’m seeking.

Q: If you had twice as much time as you have now, what would you do with the extra time?

A: I think if I had twice as much time I would fritter away lots of it on useless stuff. I’m better off trying to do what I can with the time I have. That’s hard to say because I would love to do more and live forever but it’s the result of hard meditative thought and I stand by it.

Q: Kids summer camps always look like so much fun. If you could go to summer camp, what kind of camp(s) would you want to attend?

A: My perfect summer camp would just be all the activities with no theme. But I have a dream of running a religious studies summer camp for atheists. I am not religious, but don’t like people trashing religions without knowing them well. And I think an immersive environment with skits and stuff would be a great way to get to know sacred literature so you could trash it more respectfully or maybe just coexist with it. Or I’d like to run executive retreats on my farm, which is basically a summer camp. I just never have sat down and figured out how to make these things profitable.

 


Shameless self promotion: Don’t forget to check out my (Pam Stucky’s) book, Letters from Wishing Rock (a novel with recipes) too!

in print:
CreateSpace
Poor Richard’s Book Shoppe in Gastonia, NC
Amazon.com

ebook:
Buy for iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, iTunes
Buy for Kindle
Buy for Kindle in the UK
Buy for Nook
Buy for Sony eReader
Buy at GoodReads

Don’t have an e-reader? Get a free Kindle reading app!

Q&A: Author Molly Ringle

It’s the second of our Q&As! This time we talk to author Molly Ringle. I have a fabulous assortment of people coming up, and everyone has something interesting to say. Yes, I know you do too! Want to be a part of a Q&A? Send me a message on twitter, or contact me through my website!

Q: Tell us a bit about your books.

A: I have two novels categorized as romance of the regular adult variety: The Ghost Downstairs (paranormal romance; haunted house in Seattle), and Summer Term (contemporary comedic romance; lowly grad student meets famous actor). I also have a YA novel, What Scotland Taught Me, about American teens getting into relationship tangles in Edinburgh. And soon I’ll have a novella coming out, Of Ghosts and Geeks, which is particularly silly paranormal romance–almost a parody of paranormal romance, really–and I merely hope it’ll make people laugh.

Q: Where do you get your inspiration for your stories?

A: I hardly even know. I’m always on the lookout for stories. Or rather, since I’ve been toiling at fiction for over twenty years now, my mind has arranged itself to look at everything in terms of a possible story. Dreams, news articles, movies, random encounters, subjects I’m studying–I’ve turned all those things and more into stories. I have no shortage of story ideas, only a shortage of time to write them!

Q: Two questions – answer separately or together: As an adult writing young adult books, do you draw more on how your youth really was, or on how you would have liked it to be? How much of yourself goes into your stories?

A: I doubt anyone would specifically want their youth to resemble Eva’s adventures in What Scotland Taught Me–she’s kind of a mess, and ends up paying for it! (Although romance is the central concern, I think of it more as a comeuppance story than as a romance.) But, while I did invent a lot of her problems for dramatic effect, it’s true I drew on what life taught me as I grew up. I think it’s what all young adults eventually learn, regardless of new technologies or changing fashions: you can’t please everyone, so you’d best form standards for yourself and then stay true to those.

As to how much of myself goes into my characters and stories: it’s an interesting paradox, isn’t it? You can only write what you know–or at least what you’re capable of imagining–and that means you’re always writing something that comes from within your own mind. But at the same time, most of us who write fiction do it because we like to escape ourselves and the real world, and pretend we’re someone else for a little while. I try never to be baldly autobiographical with any character or plot line. I do like escaping into the heads of other people. But if strong emotion is called for, do I draw upon similar moments in my own memory? You bet.

Q: You like to write about ghosts. Have you had ghostly experiences of your own? Do you believe?

A: I have never seen nor experienced anything supernatural; at least, not that I’ve noticed. But ghost stories have always fascinated me. I think it’s because ghosts are the scariest to me of all the paranormal choices. Vampires, werewolves, faeries, witches, et cetera–eh, they’re all super cool, but rarely frightening to me. Ghosts, however, give me the chills. I couldn’t get past a few episodes of the show “Supernatural.” I was too freaked out. I actually put off writing The Ghost Downstairs for a few years after initially thinking up the idea because I suspected I’d give myself the creeps by immersing myself in a story like that for months on end. (I did have a couple of nightmares while working on it!) So, unlike Fox Mulder, I don’t really want to believe, because it would be much scarier if ghosts were real and traipsing into my bedroom at night. Still, people I know and trust have claimed they’ve had ghostly encounters, and that makes me wonder if something isn’t going on in the haunted locales of the world. Maybe science will figure it out someday. In the meantime, this stuff is gold for us storytellers.

Q: What is some of the best writing advice you’ve received or read?

A: I love the advice that you should write for your ideal reader, that imaginary person who will adore every word of your story, who is dying for a book exactly like the one you’re writing. You have to forget what your grandma, your boss, or your weird neighbor will think when they read it. Pretend you’re using a pen name that no one in your daily life will ever know about. In fact, you can always do that if you want (i.e., adopt a pseudonym), so drop the fear of judgment, and say what the characters need to say!

Q: Worst advice?

A: Okay, I keep remembering a writing class I took in college, where we read some article (or book, or something) that advised writers to “make the reader uncomfortable on the first page.” I see what they’re getting at. You do want to stir up interest and reaction in your reader right off the bat, and an unnerving beginning is one way to do that. But aiming for discomfort doesn’t seem entirely wise. Then you just get a lot of amateur authors starting their novels with some disgusting event, simply for effect. I’d much rather make the reader smile on the first page, myself.

Q: Here on my blog we talk about happiness a lot. What makes you happy, brings you joy?

A: Big hugs from family and friends. Unseasonable weather–mild sunshine in winter, cool rain in summer. A peanut butter sandwich with a glass of chocolate milk. Seeing my flower and vegetable seedlings sprout and grow. Stuff that smells good, especially if it’s a new discovery (new to me, that is) of something that smells good. A song I love. Installments of a great book or TV show I’m experiencing for the first time. Views of Puget Sound and the mountains. Those rare days when I know with possibly delusional certainty that the story I’m working on is going to be awesome.

Q: Where, when, how can we buy your books?

Connect with Molly!

 


Shameless self promotion: Don’t forget to check out my (Pam Stucky’s) book, Letters from Wishing Rock (a novel with recipes) too!

in print:
CreateSpace
Poor Richard’s Book Shoppe in Gastonia, NC
Amazon.com

ebook:
Buy for iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, iTunes
Buy for Kindle
Buy for Kindle in the UK
Buy for Nook
Buy for Sony eReader
Buy at GoodReads

Don’t have an e-reader? Get a free Kindle reading app!

Q&A: Author Cyndi Tefft

Q: Tell us about your upcoming book!

A: Between is a young adult paranormal romance about a modern American girl who dies in a car accident and the 18th century Scottish Highlander who comes to take her to heaven. Here’s the blurb from the cover:

It just figures that the love of Lindsey Water’s life isn’t alive at all, but the grim reaper, complete with a dimpled smile and Scottish accent.

After transporting souls to heaven for the last 300 years, Aiden MacRae has all but given up on finding the one whose love will redeem him and allow him entry through the pearly gates.

Torn between her growing attraction to Aiden and heaven’s siren song, Lindsey must learn the hard way whether love really can transcend all boundaries.

Q: What inspired your story?

A: I was watching a video with Stephenie Meyer where she was talking about being a stay-at-home mom who had a dream and wrote it down. She made it sound simple and I wondered if I might be able to do the same. Having been through it now, I can tell you that writing a book is not simple, but it is something that you can do if you set your mind to it.

About that same time, I was reading Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series and completely fell in love with Scotland and the history of the nation. I wanted a Scottish hero of my own, so I wrote one!

Q: How do you write? In an office, at the beach, in the morning, late at night? How do you find time to write, with kids, a husband, and a full time job?

A: I usually write on my laptop while sitting on the couch (I know, not the most ergonomically sound choice). There is no way to find time to write; you have to make time because it’s important to you. In the evenings after the kids went to bed, I started writing instead of watching television. On the weekends while everyone was sleeping in, I’d sometimes wake up early with a scene I needed to get down. My husband has always been very supportive of my need to write and sometimes took the kids to the park when I was particularly manic about getting some writing done!

Q: What is some of the best writing advice you’ve received or read?

A: On Writing by Stephen King is fantastic. I found myself nodding along and thinking “Amen!” as I read that book. I got it from the library and loved it so much that I bought a copy for my bookshelf. He talks about the fear of confronting a blank page, and says that you need to write your first draft without thinking of anyone else, like you’re writing in your underwear. After you get the first draft down, then you can edit it, but write for yourself as if no one else were going to read it.

Q: Worst advice?

A: Wow, there is so much advice floating around online that it’s hard to know what is good and what is bad. So much of it is conflicting, too! I think the idea that you should write for the market is widespread but terrible advice. The market is ever changing and it can take a long time from when you begin writing to when it is in front of the consumer, so trying to time the market will likely result in half-hearted, copycat stories that don’t reflect the true you.

Q: What made you decide to be an independent author?

A: I finished the first draft of Between in about six months, then spent over a year editing it and trying to get it traditionally published. It was a very long year, full of joyous excitement and rock-bottom lows. Readers seemed to enjoy the book, but I wasn’t getting anywhere with the traditional publication route. I finally realized that agents and editors are looking at each manuscript through a critical lens whereas readers are just interested in a good story.

The characters in Between are slightly older than a typical young adult novel and the storyline doesn’t fit the mold of the romance genre, so agents would have a hard time placing it with a house. A reader doesn’t have to worry about any of that; they are just weighing whether they liked it or not.

Going the independent route is not for the faint of heart, though. There is no one to come along side you and tell you how it should be done. On the other hand, indie authors have control over covers, fonts, marketing and such that traditionally published authors do not. One is not better than the other (in my opinion), and I think that sentiment will become more widespread as time goes on.

Q: Here on my blog we talk about happiness a lot. What makes you happy, brings you joy?

A: Great question! I am incredibly blessed to have a multitude of things that make me smile: my family, my friends, my church, the new house we just bought and of course, my book! I’ll never forget the joy of holding the printed copy in my hands for the first time.

I love to sing and usually hum to myself wherever I go. And though I’ve only been doing it for a couple of years, writing is part of the list of things that bring me joy as well. Yep, blessed indeed!

Q: Where and when can we buy your book?

A: Between launches on June 1 and will be available for sale in both print and ebook formats. You can find it at online retailers such as Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Apple, Smashwords and CreateSpace.

Connect with Cyndi!

 


Shameless self promotion: Don’t forget to check out my book, Letters from Wishing Rock (a novel with recipes) too!

in print:
CreateSpace
Poor Richard’s Book Shoppe in Gastonia, NC
Amazon.com

ebook:
Buy for iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, iTunes
Buy for Kindle
Buy for Kindle in the UK
Buy for Nook
Buy for Sony eReader
Buy at GoodReads

Don’t have an e-reader? Get a free Kindle reading app!